Ephesus Turkey Travel Guide


Ephesus Turkey Travel Guide
A Vagabond Life

Ephesus Turkey Travel Guide A Vagabond Life

Ephesus, situated in modern-day Turkey, is a mesmerizing archaeological site that stands as a testament to the grandeur of ancient civilizations. Originally founded by the Greeks in the 10th century BC, Ephesus flourished as a major Greek and later Roman city, becoming one of the largest metropolises of the ancient world. Its strategic location as a port city on the Aegean coast facilitated its growth into a thriving hub of commerce, culture, and spirituality.

Today, visitors to Ephesus can wander through its remarkably preserved ruins, marveling at iconic structures such as the Library of Celsus, the Great Theater, and the Temple of Artemis, one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World. The site’s rich history and architectural splendor offer a fascinating glimpse into the daily lives of its inhabitants, spanning centuries of civilization.

Exploring Ephesus is a journey back in time, where the echoes of ancient footsteps still resonate amidst the columns and cobblestone streets, making it a must-visit destination for history enthusiasts and travelers alike.

Tckets can be purchased at the gate.

Ephesus Turkey Table Of Contents

Ephesus Turkey Map
Selcuk/Ephesus Turkey Placeholder
Selcuk/Ephesus Turkey

Things To See & Do In Ephesus Turkey

The Library of Celsus

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The Library of Celsus

The Library of Celsus of Ephesus Turkey was built in honour of the Roman Senator Tiberius Julius Celsus Polemaeanus and completed between circa 114–117 A.D. The library was “one of the most impressive buildings in the Roman Empire” and built to store 12,000 scrolls and to serve as a mausoleum for Celsus, who is buried in a crypt beneath the library in a decorated marble sarcophagus.

The Temple of Hadrian

The Temple of Hadrian

The Temple of Hadrian is a firm favourite with visitors and dates from the 2nd century, it has been re erected from the surviving architectural  fragments. The reliefs in the upper sections are casts, the originals now being exhibited in the Ephesus Turkey Archaeological Museum.

The Temple of Artemis

The Temple of Artemis

The Temple of Artemis was once one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World, once boasted 127 marble columns. The temple took 120 years to build but today is now one lonely column sitting in an empty field.

The Odeon

The Odeon

The Odeon was a small roofed theatre constructed by Publius Vedius Antoninus and his wife around 150 AD. It was a small salon for plays and concerts, seating about 1,500 people. The upper part of the theatre was decorated with red granite pillars in the Corinthian style. The entrances were at both sides of the stage and reached by a few steps.

The Temple of Domitian

The  Temple of Domitian

The  Temple of Domitiandedicated to the Flavian dynasty, was one of the largest temples in the city. It was erected on a pseudodipteral plan with 8 × 13 columns. The temple and its statue are some of the few remains connected with Domitian.

The Great Theatre

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The Great Theatre

The Great Theatre was built on the foot of Panayir mountain and its facade faced the Harbour street, in the first century AD and later on it was renovated by several Roman Emperors. It is considered to be the most imposing and the most impressive structure of Ephesus city. It could host up to 25,000 spectators.

Curetes Street

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Curetes Street

Curetes Street is one of the three main streets of Ephesus between The Hercules Gate till to the Celsus Library and incredibly impressive. in its hey day the street had fountains, monuments, statues and shops on the sides of the street. Over the years many earthquakes hit Ephesus damaging the structures, which were replaced and restored as such the street now has its appearance from the 4th century.

Map Of Ephesus Turkey

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